Monday, 25 August 2014

The storycards in action

This afternoon I read the fairy book again to a few children and when I was finished they wanted more... instead of re-reading I got them to hang up the story cards so that I could read them a story from the cards they chose... they were happy to do this... then I took a step back and let the children get on with the cards...

They arranged the mat like a portal (so I was told... a word they have learnt from the fairy book, although one child isalready quite familiar with the word) - then they collected small piles of cards each and arranged themselves like a meeting to tell a story together.

They struggled here... there was lots of preparation and announcements that they were going to start, but I could not see their play starting as they were planning (even though it was all play)... so I noted that it might be an idea to sit in a circle and practice how to tell a story as a community, so they can apply that to their own play (the idea was there, but they seemed to lack the experience to put it into practice).

In the end they seemed to settle into pairs and looks through their stack of cards commenting, and creating a series of short stories.

One child started to line on cards on one of the long mirrors from Ikea... and this was soon copied by two other children, it alowed them to transport their story around the room.

In total there were 8 children ranging from 2-4 years of age... they spent just over 45 minutes in deep concentration playing with story ideas and trying to work out how to create stories together.

By observing the children I can be of better support as a teacher ... I know where I can best place my guidance so that their storyand language skills can grow together and individually.



It is also interesting to see which cards the children are taking... the card of Elsa from frozen is popular with one child... calling it "let it go" card, not knowing the characters name, but being familiar with the song. Others are exploring traditional Swedish stories like Pippi and Alfons and Bamse and others are exploring the images of houses and whether or not they would like to live there...

The majority of the time though was spent on sorting the piles of cards and trying to work out together the rules of the story telling game...

No comments:

Post a Comment